Multotec to supply Mill Classification Cyclones to Ngezi Phase 2

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Multotec has secured the order to supply a 12-way mill classification cyclone cluster to the Ngezi Phase 2 project, situated some 150 km south west of Harare, in the North Chamber of the Zimbabwe Great Dyke. The order placed by DRA Mineral Projects follows Multotec’s successful provision of a similar cluster for Phase 1 of this project in 2009.

The Ngezi Phase 2 Project is being constructed at the existing Ngezi Concentrator which was commissioned in 2009. Phase 2 comprises an additional portal, primary crushing, overland conveying, silo, stockpile storage and a second platinum concentrator.

The Multotec classification cyclone cluster comprises 12 high capacity 420 mm diameter cyclones. These high capacity cyclones will be supplied with 25 mm replaceable natural rubber liners and mild steel shells. The replaceable rubber liners deliver up to three times the life of conventional liners which reduces operating costs, maintenance and stockholdings.

The cyclones will be installed in closed circuit with a ball mill,with overflow reporting to flotation and underflow reporting back to the mill circuit for further grinding.

Nine of the 12 cyclones will be in operation, with the remaining three on standby to ensure continuous operating time. The cyclones have pneumatic valves for automation and to make the process less labour intensive. The feed pulp distributor and the underflow tank are ceramic tiled with a rubber lined overflow tank.

“This is standard equipment which will allow us to supply spare parts at relatively short notice,” Tumi Matsebedi, a senior process engineer at Multotec, says. “The client has also been advised of strategic and two-year operating spares to allow for future maintenance planning. However, the cyclone cluster for Phase 2 differs from that supplied for Phase 1 in that it will be equipped with a specialised gantry to allow access to the valves for ease of maintenance.

“This equipment will be transported by road from South Africa to Zimbabwe, and during the design stage particular attention was paid to ensuring a compact design that won’t require a low bed or abnormal load vehicle. This will help keep logistical costs down.”